International Journal of Sports Science and Physical Education

Research Article | | Peer-Reviewed |

The Intervention Effect of Progressive Exercise Training on Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Received: Jan. 11, 2024    Accepted: Jan. 20, 2024    Published: Feb. 01, 2024
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Abstract

Background: Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental condition characterized by challenges in social interaction, communication, and restricted repetitive behaviors. Individuals with ASD often experience sensory sensitivities and motor coordination difficulties, impacting their daily functioning and overall well-being. Traditional physical education programs have been employed to address these challenges, but there is growing interest in exploring alternative interventions, such as progressive exercise training, to enhance the physical and cognitive abilities of children with ASD. Objective: To explore the effects of a progressive exercise intervention on children with ASD. Method: A total of 25 children with ASD participated in the study, with 11 in the intervention group and 14 in the control group. The intervention group received progressive exercise training for 10 weeks, three times a week, for 40 minutes each session, totaling 30 interventions. Results: Both the progressive exercise intervention group and the traditional physical education group showed significant improvements in sensory, social, motor, and self-care abilities in children with ASD. The progressive exercise intervention group showed faster progress in social interaction and self-care abilities, while the improvements in sensory and motor functions manifested later. In terms of total scores and social interaction dimension, the improvement in the progressive intervention group at each time point was significantly greater compared to the traditional physical education group. Conclusion: Progressive exercise training can significantly improve symptoms in various aspects of children with autism, and its effectiveness is superior to that of the traditional physical education group.

DOI 10.11648/ijsspe.20240901.11
Published in International Journal of Sports Science and Physical Education ( Volume 9, Issue 1, April 2024 )
Page(s) 1-6
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Autism Spectrum Disorder, Exercise, Intervention, Progressive Exercise Training

References
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  • APA Style

    Ren, J., Xiao, H. (2024). The Intervention Effect of Progressive Exercise Training on Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. International Journal of Sports Science and Physical Education, 9(1), 1-6. https://doi.org/10.11648/ijsspe.20240901.11

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    ACS Style

    Ren, J.; Xiao, H. The Intervention Effect of Progressive Exercise Training on Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Int. J. Sports Sci. Phys. Educ. 2024, 9(1), 1-6. doi: 10.11648/ijsspe.20240901.11

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    AMA Style

    Ren J, Xiao H. The Intervention Effect of Progressive Exercise Training on Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Int J Sports Sci Phys Educ. 2024;9(1):1-6. doi: 10.11648/ijsspe.20240901.11

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  • @article{10.11648/ijsspe.20240901.11,
      author = {Jianchang Ren and Haili Xiao},
      title = {The Intervention Effect of Progressive Exercise Training on Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder},
      journal = {International Journal of Sports Science and Physical Education},
      volume = {9},
      number = {1},
      pages = {1-6},
      doi = {10.11648/ijsspe.20240901.11},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/ijsspe.20240901.11},
      eprint = {https://download.sciencepg.com/pdf/10.11648.ijsspe.20240901.11},
      abstract = {Background: Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental condition characterized by challenges in social interaction, communication, and restricted repetitive behaviors. Individuals with ASD often experience sensory sensitivities and motor coordination difficulties, impacting their daily functioning and overall well-being. Traditional physical education programs have been employed to address these challenges, but there is growing interest in exploring alternative interventions, such as progressive exercise training, to enhance the physical and cognitive abilities of children with ASD. Objective: To explore the effects of a progressive exercise intervention on children with ASD. Method: A total of 25 children with ASD participated in the study, with 11 in the intervention group and 14 in the control group. The intervention group received progressive exercise training for 10 weeks, three times a week, for 40 minutes each session, totaling 30 interventions. Results: Both the progressive exercise intervention group and the traditional physical education group showed significant improvements in sensory, social, motor, and self-care abilities in children with ASD. The progressive exercise intervention group showed faster progress in social interaction and self-care abilities, while the improvements in sensory and motor functions manifested later. In terms of total scores and social interaction dimension, the improvement in the progressive intervention group at each time point was significantly greater compared to the traditional physical education group. Conclusion: Progressive exercise training can significantly improve symptoms in various aspects of children with autism, and its effectiveness is superior to that of the traditional physical education group.
    },
     year = {2024}
    }
    

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    T1  - The Intervention Effect of Progressive Exercise Training on Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
    AU  - Jianchang Ren
    AU  - Haili Xiao
    Y1  - 2024/02/01
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    DO  - 10.11648/ijsspe.20240901.11
    T2  - International Journal of Sports Science and Physical Education
    JF  - International Journal of Sports Science and Physical Education
    JO  - International Journal of Sports Science and Physical Education
    SP  - 1
    EP  - 6
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2575-1611
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/ijsspe.20240901.11
    AB  - Background: Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental condition characterized by challenges in social interaction, communication, and restricted repetitive behaviors. Individuals with ASD often experience sensory sensitivities and motor coordination difficulties, impacting their daily functioning and overall well-being. Traditional physical education programs have been employed to address these challenges, but there is growing interest in exploring alternative interventions, such as progressive exercise training, to enhance the physical and cognitive abilities of children with ASD. Objective: To explore the effects of a progressive exercise intervention on children with ASD. Method: A total of 25 children with ASD participated in the study, with 11 in the intervention group and 14 in the control group. The intervention group received progressive exercise training for 10 weeks, three times a week, for 40 minutes each session, totaling 30 interventions. Results: Both the progressive exercise intervention group and the traditional physical education group showed significant improvements in sensory, social, motor, and self-care abilities in children with ASD. The progressive exercise intervention group showed faster progress in social interaction and self-care abilities, while the improvements in sensory and motor functions manifested later. In terms of total scores and social interaction dimension, the improvement in the progressive intervention group at each time point was significantly greater compared to the traditional physical education group. Conclusion: Progressive exercise training can significantly improve symptoms in various aspects of children with autism, and its effectiveness is superior to that of the traditional physical education group.
    
    VL  - 9
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Author Information
  • College of Physical Education and Sports Science, Lingnan Normal University, Zhanjiang, China

  • College of Physical Education and Sports Science, Lingnan Normal University, Zhanjiang, China

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